Moth1Come and share Bob Smith’s joy and wonder in the natural world of moths at the Stroud Congregational Church Hall http://www.stroudcongchurch.org.uk/ in Bedford Street on Friday at 7.30. Bob Smith is from the local branch of Butterfly Conservation. This talk is about some of the moths that he has recorded in his garden at Chalford Hill and includes stories of their strange lives, very strange caterpillars and how they got some of their odd names.

But there is a serious point to the talk.

According to Butterfly Conservation https://butterfly-conservation.org/moths/why-moths-matter ‘studies have found that the overall number of moths has decreased by 28% since 1968. The situation is particularly bad in southern Britain, where moth numbers are down by 40%. Many individual species have declined dramatically in recent decades and over 60 became extinct in the 20th century.  Sadly, among the species which have declined are many beautiful moths which were previously very common and frequently seen in our gardens. 

These alarming decreases in moth populations are not just bad news for the moths themselves, but also have worrying implications for the rest of our wildlife. Moths and their caterpillars are important food items for many other species, including amphibians, small mammals, bats and many bird species. Moth caterpillars are especially important for feeding young chicks, including those of most familiar garden birds such as the Blue Tit and Great Tit, Robin, Wren and Blackbird. Moths are an indicator species play a vital role in telling us about the health of our environment, like the canary in the coalmine. Whatever the causes, the decrease in moth numbers is a warning to us that all is not well with our environment.

Butterfly Conservation point out that Moths also play a vital role in telling us about the health of our environment, like the canary in the coalmine. Since they are so widespread and found in so many different habitats, and are so sensitive to changes, moths are particularly useful as indicator species. Whatever the causes, the decrease in moth numbers is a warning to us that all is not well with our environment’.

It isn’t too late for us to start doing something about it, and it starts at home, in our own garden. Come to our talk and find out how to get moths in your garden.

Stroud Valleys Project is a limited company,
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Stroud Valleys Project

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Gloucestershire

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